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Lake Oconee Academy Course Catalog


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9th Grade Literature and Composition: *Required

This course focuses on a study of literary genres; the students develop initial understanding of both the structure and the meaning of a literary work. The students explore the effect of the literary form in regards to interpretation. The students will read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the focus is technical writing in ninth grade literature, the student will also demonstrate competency in a variety of writing genres: narrative, expository, persuasive, and technical. The students will engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. The students demonstrate an understanding of listening, speaking, and viewing skills for a variety of purposes. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

10th Grade Literature and composition

This course focuses on a study of literary genres; the student develops understanding that theme is what relates literature to life and that themes are recurring in the literary world. The students explore the effect of themes in regard to interpretation. The students will read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the focus is persuasive writing in tenth grade literature, the student will also demonstrate competency in a variety of writing genres: narrative, expository, and technical. The student will engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. The students demonstrate an understanding of listening, speaking, and viewing skills for a variety of purposes.

American Literature and Composition *Required

This course focuses on the study of American literature, writing modes and genres, and essential conventions for reading, writing, and speaking. The student develops an understanding of chronological context and the relevance of period structures in American literature. The students develop an understanding of the ways the period of literature affects its structure and how the chronology of a work affects its meaning. The students read a variety of informational and literary texts in all genres and modes of discourse. Reading across the curriculum develops students’ academic and personal interests in different subjects. While expository writing is the focus in American literature, the students will also demonstrate competency in a variety of writing genres: narrative, persuasive, and technical. The student will engage in research, timed writing, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking. The students demonstrate an understanding of listening, speaking, and viewing skills for a variety of purposes. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

Multicultural Literature and Composition

The course focuses on world literature by and about people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Students explore themes of linguistic and cultural diversity by comparing, contrasting, analyzing, and critiquing writing styles and universal themes. The students write expository, analytical, and response essays. A research component is critical. The students observe and listen critically and respond appropriately to written and oral communication. Conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking. Instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking rather than in isolation. The students understand and acquire new vocabulary and use it correctly in reading, writing, and speaking.

Creative Writing (Elective)

This course provides review and further exploration of the writing process, including planning, drafting, and revising. The Creative Writing course is designed for students who enjoy writing as a form of art and personal expression. ... To develop original writing pieces, students will engage in writing workshops, literary element development lessons, writing/author studies, and peer reviews/conferences. The course also covers application of advanced grammar and usage skills.

Algebra I *Required

The fundamental purpose of Algebra is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Algebra uses algebra to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

Geometry *Required

The focus of Geometry on the coordinate plane is organized into 6 critical areas. Transformations on the coordinate plane provide opportunities for the formal study of congruence and similarity. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. The study of circles uses similarity and congruence to develop basic theorems relating circles and lines. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. Quadratic expressions, equations, and functions are developed; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Algebra. Circles return with their quadratic algebraic representations on the coordinate plane. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

Algebra II *Required

It is in Algebra II that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into six critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to model periodic phenomena. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus focuses on standards to prepare students for a more intense study of mathematics. The critical areas organized in seven units delve deeper into content from previous courses. The study of circles and parabolas is extended to include other conics such as ellipses and hyperbolas. Trigonometric functions are further developed to include inverses, general triangles and identities. Matrices provide an organizational structure in which to represent and solve complex problems. Students expand the concepts of complex numbers and the coordinate plane to represent and operate upon vectors. Probability rounds out the course using counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Math of Finance

This course concentrates on the mathematics necessary to understand and make informed decisions related to personal finance. The mathematics in the course will be based on many topics in prior courses; however, the specific applications will extend the student’s understanding of when and how to use these topics.

Statistics

Enables students to apply statistical methods in problem solving using data collected through experimentation, computer simulations, and various sources. Provides opportunities to model statistical methods, derive probabilities, and make inferences. Presents applications of statistics in real-life situations and shows how misleading statistics could be better presented. Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, and Advanced Algebra.

Economics *Required

An introductory course into the principles of economics. The course includes topics related to Fundamental Economic Concepts, Microeconomics Concepts, Macroeconomics Concepts, International Economics, and Personal Finance Economics. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

United States Government and Politics *Required

An in-depth study of the American political system. This course focuses on the foundation, principles and structure of the American system of government, examines the role of political parties, social factors as they relate to the role of the citizen, and analyzes the decision-making process that are a part of the system of American political behavior. This course meets the state’s Citizenship requirement for graduation.

United States History *Required

Examines the history of the United States beginning with the British settlement of North America . The course’s main focus is the development of the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course includes topics related to Colonization through the Constitution; New Republic to Reconstruction; Industrialization, Reform, and Imperialism; Establishment as a World Power; and the Modern Era. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

World History *Required

A survey course beginning with the earliest civilizations and highlighting important developments throughout the world until the early 21st century. The course includes topics related to Early Civilizations and Classical Empires; Growth, Expansion, and the Emergence of the Modern World; Global Interaction and Conflict; and the Contemporary World.

Psychology (Elective)

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. It is a unique science that often necessitates the use of special measurements and research methods. The course has four sections: psychological foundations and research, biological foundations, change in behavior and cognition, and variability of behavior among individual and groups.

Physical Science *Required (Can be replaced with Physics)

The Physical Science curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to have a richer knowledge base in physical science. This course is designed as a survey course of chemistry and physics. This curriculum includes the more abstract concepts such as the conceptualization of the structure of atoms, motion and forces, and the conservation of energy and matter, the action/reaction principle, and wave behavior. Students investigate physical science concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

Biology *Required

The Biology curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the life sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in biology. This course can also serve as the Pre-AP Biology course for these students who plan to include AP Biology in their study plan. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the interdependence of organisms, the relationship of matter, energy, and organization in living systems, the behavior of organisms, and biological evolution. Students will investigate biological concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry. This course requires students to take the Georgia Milestones End of Course Test.

Chemistry

The Chemistry curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in chemistry. This course can also serve as the Pre-AP Chemistry course for those students who plan to include AP Chemistry in their study plan. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the structure of atoms, structure and properties of matter, characterization of the properties that describe solutions and the nature of acids and bases, and the conservation and interaction of energy and matter. Students investigate chemistry concepts through experience in laboratories and field-work using the processes of inquiry.

Physics

The Physics curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in physics. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as interactions of matter and energy, velocity, acceleration, force, energy, momentum, and charge. This course introduces the students to the study of the correction to Newtonian physics given by quantum mechanics and relativity. Students investigate physics concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.

Anatomy

The human anatomy and physiology curriculum is designed to continue student investigations that began in grades K-8 and high school biology. This curriculum is extensively performance and laboratory based. It integrates the study of the structures and functions of the human body, however rather than focusing on distinct anatomical and physiological systems (respiratory, nervous, etc.) instruction should focus on the essential requirements for life. Areas of study include organization of the body; protection, support and movement; providing internal coordination and regulation; processing and transporting; and reproduction, growth and development. Whenever possible, careers related to medicine, research, health-care and modern medical technology should be emphasized throughout the curriculum. Case studies concerning diseases, disorders and ailments (i.e. real-life applications) should be emphasized.

Forensics

In this course students will learn the scientific protocols for analyzing a crime scene, how to use chemical and physical separation methods to isolate and identify materials, how to analyze biological evidence and the criminal use of tools, including impressions from firearms, tool marks, arson, and explosive evidence.

Environmental Science

These standards integrate the study of many components of our environment, including the human impact on our planet. Students investigate the flow of energy and cycling of matter within ecosystems, and evaluate types, availability, allocation, and sustainability of energy resources. Instruction should focus on student data collection and analysis from field and laboratory experiences.

Spanish I

Introduces the Spanish language; emphasizes all skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Includes how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to develop an understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures.

Spanish II

Enhances Level One skills in Spanish and provides opportunities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to increase understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures. This course serves as a Pre-AP Spanish Language course for those students who want to take AP Spanish Language as an 11th grader.

Spanish III

Enhances Level Two skills in Spanish and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in previous topics and introduces new topics; offers further opportunities to increase understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures. This course serves as a Pre-AP Spanish Language course for those students who want to take AP Spanish Language as an 11th grader.

Spanish IV

Enhances Level Three skills in Spanish and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued language development through exploration of familiar and unfamiliar topics and provides opportunities for a broader and more extensive understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures. This course serves as a Pre-AP Spanish class for those 11th graders who will take AP Spanish Language and Culture as 12th graders.

Visual Arts Comprehensive I

Introduces art history, art criticism, aesthetic judgment and studio production. Emphasizes the ability to understand and use elements and principles of design through a variety of media, processes and visual resources. Explores master artworks for historical and cultural significance.

Visual Arts Comprehensive II

Enhances level-one skills in art history, art criticism, aesthetic judgment and studio production. Emphasizes and reinforces knowledge and application of the design elements and their relationship to the principles of design. Explores different two-and three-dimensional art media and processes. Investigates master artworks to increase awareness and to examine the role of art and the artist in past and contemporary societies.

Visual Arts Comprehensive III

Enhances level-two skills in art history, art criticism, aesthetic judgment and studio production. Provides practice in applying design elements and principles of design. Provides focus on different two- and three-dimensional art media and processes and master artworks. Stresses idea development through production and creativity and through the study of master artists.

Visual Arts Comprehensive IV

Enhances level-three skills in art history, art criticism, aesthetic judgment and studio production. Provides opportunities for in-depth application of design elements and principles of design in two-and three-dimensional art media and processes. Stresses creative problem solving through art production and the study of master artists and their works.

Visual Arts/Sculpture I & II

Introduces the design and production of relief sculpture and sculpture-in-the-round. Emphasizes the historical origins and functions of sculpture in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes additive, subtractive and modeling methods; explores traditional and nontraditional materials for sculpted works and their sculptors.

Visual Arts.Applied Design I

Emphasizes design elements and principles in the production of applied design art products and/or designs such as architecture, advertisements, graphic designs, environmental designs, and product designs. Stresses proper use of equipment and vocabulary and technical terms. Investigates the computer and its influence on and role in creating contemporary design s. Includes a cultural and historical study of master design works of different periods and styles.

Digital Photograhy I & II

Introduces photography as an art form. Covers the historical development of
photography and photographic design and its cultural influences. Emphasizes the basics of exposing and processing photographs by introducing traditional and digital photography. Stresses appropriate processing techniques and safe use of photographic materials and equipment.

Audio/Video Technology

This sequence of courses prepares the student for employment or entry into a postsecondary education program in the Broadcast/Video Production career field. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to: history of mass media, terminology, safety, basic equipment, script writing, production teams, production and programming, set production, lighting, recording and editing, studio production, and professional ethics. Skills USA, the Georgia Scholastic Press Association, Technology Student Association (TSA) and Student Television Network are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program.

Introduction to Business and Technology

This course provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today’s business environment. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information based society.

Legal Environment of Business

This course is an introduction into the basic laws of business; criminal and civil. The course will look at case studies with current and past notorious crimes. Will also focus on state and federal legal systems.

Introduction to Digital Technology

This course is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web-design, IT support and networks are taught in a computer lab with hands on activities and project focused tasks.

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship focuses on recognizing a business opportunity, starting a business, operating and maintaining a business. Students will be exposed to the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and innovation in this course as they will either be the business owner or individuals working in a competitive job market in the future. Integration of accounting, finance, marketing, business management, legal and economic environments will be developed throughout projects in this course. Working to develop a business plan that includes structuring the organization, financing the organization, and managing information, operations, marketing, and human resources will be a focus in the course. Engaging students in the creation and management of a business and the challenges of being a small business owner will be fulfilled in this course. Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources and application of business principles for starting, operating and maintaining a business. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course.

Work-Based Learning (11th & 12th grade only)

Work-Based Learning placements are structured experiences that connect the student's career goal and classroom learning with a productive work environment. Work-Based Learning represents the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be in grades 11 or 12 and at least 16 years old. There are several opportunities for students to participate in work-based learning. These opportunities include employability skill development, Cooperative Education, Internship, Youth Apprenticeship, and Clinical Experiences. Work-Based Learning includes a student placement that may be paid or unpaid positions. Work-Based Learning provides students with opportunities for instruction not only in academics but also in occupational skills, career exploration, and guidance in identifying employment and educational goals. Students have the opportunity to connect what they learn in school with work-site application, enabling a smooth transition into the work force and/or education beyond high school.

Engineering

The Foundations of Engineering and Technology is the introductory course for the
Engineering and Technology Education pathways. This STEM driven course provides the students with an overview of engineering and technology including the different methods used in the engineering design process developing fundamental technology and engineering literacy. Students will demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have learned through various project based activities while using an engineering design process to successfully master the “E” in STEM.

Robotics

This course focuses on automated manufacturing/systems. Students will state and discuss the components of an automated system, state and discuss the advantages and disadvantage of automating a production system on a global economy. Design, develop, and analyze robotics and robotic products.

Concert Band

Enhances level-one skills and provides further opportunities for advanced-level performers to develop and refine performance skills and precision on a wind or percussion instrument. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and appreciation of music. Stresses self-paced progress, individual learning strategies and ensemble experiences.

Piano

Offers opportunities for intermediate-level performers to increase performance skills and knowledge in keyboard techniques. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and appreciation of music. Provides an individualized setting.

Musical Theater

This course will explore audition techniques, the singing actor, basic body & vocal control, choreography, script analysis, proper stage etiquette & professionalism, building a character, and the performer/audience relationship. In addition to the performance aspects of musical theater, the technical, behind-the-scenes, and publicity aspects will also be explored (including lighting, sound, stage management, set design, costuming, props, tickets, flyers, posters, programs and advertising). Initially, basic techniques will be developed through monologue work, song work, improvisation, group scenes, and theatre games. Culminating activities will include producing and competing in a Fall One-Act GHSA Competition piece, competing in GHSA Literary Meet in early spring, and producing a Spring Musical.

Chorus

This course works to identify vocal anatomy and develops proper techniques to support clear and free tone. Perform assigned vocal part in unison and simple harmony. Develop listening skills. Sing within the ensemble and as an individual.

Journalism/News & Yearbook

This course is designed for the college bound student interested in learning all facets of production for a newsmagazine. Students in this class will learn how to write journalistically as well as how to layout articles and pages on the computer. Students will also learn the principles of design, writing and photography necessary to produce the yearbook. They must be deadline driven, work independently and show attention to detail.

Christian Learning Class (Life Skills and Careers) – Off Campus

Students will work to develop skills in decision-making, problem solving, goal-setting, self-acceptance, financial planning, college and career planning, and pursuing God’s best in all areas of our lives – all from a biblical perspective. We will study the examples of biblical men of faith and their dependence upon God to guide their lives and decisions. Paul’s life and ministry will guide our study of wise decision-making; the life of Jonah will serve as a guide as we seek to know how to understand God’s will for our lives and futures; and the life and leadership of Joshua will be the standard as we discuss spiritual leadership within the family, church, and society.

Weight Training

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn weight training concepts and techniques used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Students will benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardiorespiratory endurance activities.

General PE

Students in grades 9 – 12 will demonstrate the ability to participate in a variety of invasion, net/wall, field, target, individual, outdoor, fitness activities, rhythms, and dance. Students will demonstrate competence in at least one activity from two of three following Categories: Category 1: invasion, net/wall, or field games; Category 2: target, dance/rhythm, or outdoor activities; Category 3: fitness or individual activity.

Citizenship, Scholarship, and Community

2014 National Blue Ribbon School

2014 Best 50 Public Elementary Schools in the U.S. by TheBestSchools.org

5-Star School Climate Star Rating by the Georgia DOE

AdvancedEd Accredited


Lake Oconee Academy
1021 Titan Circle
Greensboro, GA 30642

706 454-1562
706 453-1773 (fax)